Tuesday Roundup: Choke Me Spank Me Driver Lady, Girls Gone Wild & More

  • Usually you have to pay a woman to spank and choke you — so I’m told — but a Plano bus driver was doing it for free to one of her riders. (Bonus: Sociopaths praise this psycho woman in the comments section.)
  • There’s something about cute girl criminals that’s just…Wait. What’s her age? Never mind.
  • Carolyn Barta sums up the case against a city-owned convention center hotel nicely: “Despite the economic collapse all around us and warnings in the media of municipalities in trouble, the Dallas City Council is barreling forward to build a convention center hotel. Never mind that the credit crunch is making the floating of new bonds harder. And never mind that a May referendum is yet to be held to get taxpayer approval.”

Comments

  1. Frank says:

    The statement by the mother whose child was accused of throwing a soft drink can in the bus sums it all up. She knows he can be violent but he doesn’t mean to be. He just can’t express himself. BULL! The problem is the parent!

  2. Bethany says:

    So basically, the commenters – and Frank, I can’t tell for sure – believe that you can best teach a child with problems verbalizing his emotions by using violence, not words?

  3. Frank says:

    No, Bethany, what I am saying is that I find the parents in both incidences reported severely lacking in any concern over thier own child’s behavior. Perhaps if they were just a tad less indulgent and less eager to make excuses for their little darlings that the little darlings might not be prone to such disruptive behavior.
    While I do not condone or excuse the bus driver’s actions, I also think that it is unreasonable to expect a school bus driver to put up with disrespectful or arrogant behavior.

    Xavier’s mother said:
    “Ms. Nava said she knows her son, Xavier, can be violent, and she requested an on-board monitor for that reason. ”
    “I want everyone to understand he’s not acting that way because he wants to,” she said. “He just can’t express himself.”

    Why is it suddenly reasonable for school district to provide monitors on a bus for children who aren’t able to express themselves? Why is not the parents’ responsibility to see that their children behave properly and if the do not, they must find an alternate form of transportation. The abdication of parental responsibility to the schools does not end there either.
    So, in answer to your question, I think it is the parent’s responsibility to get professional help for that violent child who has difficulty in verbalizing his emotions. If he has a tendency towards violence or misbehavior due to this difficulty, it is the parents’ responsibilty to make sure, in this case, he gets an alternate form of transportation.